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* [TUHS] eqn
@ 2019-10-04  4:20 Larry McVoy
  2019-10-04  4:35 ` Dave Horsfall
                   ` (3 more replies)
  0 siblings, 4 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Larry McVoy @ 2019-10-04  4:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: TUHS main list

So my kid is using LaTex and I'd like to show him what troff can do.
For the record, back when he was born, 20 years ago, I was program
chair for Linux Expo (which sounds like a big deal but all it meant
was I had the job of formatting the proceedings).  LaTex was a big
deal but I pushed people towards troff and the few people that took
the push came back and said "holy crap is this easy".

My kid is a math guy, does anyone have some eqn input and output 
that they can share?

Thanks,

--lm

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04  4:20 [TUHS] eqn Larry McVoy
@ 2019-10-04  4:35 ` Dave Horsfall
  2019-10-04  5:12 ` George Michaelson
                   ` (2 subsequent siblings)
  3 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Dave Horsfall @ 2019-10-04  4:35 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

On Thu, 3 Oct 2019, Larry McVoy wrote:

> So my kid is using LaTex and I'd like to show him what troff can do. For 
> the record, back when he was born, 20 years ago, I was program chair for 
> Linux Expo (which sounds like a big deal but all it meant was I had the 
> job of formatting the proceedings).  LaTex was a big deal but I pushed 
> people towards troff and the few people that took the push came back and 
> said "holy crap is this easy".

:-)

I've always liked software where the user is in charge, not whoever wrote 
the tool.  A boss of mine was into LaTeX, and I hated it.

> My kid is a math guy, does anyone have some eqn input and output that 
> they can share?

I've only ever used "neqn" and that was yonks ago, so I'd be interested in 
seeing some examples.

-- Dave

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04  4:20 [TUHS] eqn Larry McVoy
  2019-10-04  4:35 ` Dave Horsfall
@ 2019-10-04  5:12 ` George Michaelson
  2019-10-04 13:43   ` Nemo
  2019-10-04 14:57 ` aksr
  2019-10-04 19:25 ` Fabio Scotoni
  3 siblings, 1 reply; 17+ messages in thread
From: George Michaelson @ 2019-10-04  5:12 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Larry McVoy; +Cc: TUHS main list

I'm going to give a contrarian response. You may be wrong, and he
maybe should do LaTex.

Why?

because it's what his peer group, and professors, and other people
like markers and tutorial assisters will expect, and he can use things
like OverLeaf very probably on the Uni tab, which has shared edit, all
kinds of useful templates, and help communities.

You don't want to tie him to your apron strings, for help: He needs to
learn how to go out into the world and hassle other people for help
too!

My son, who is in the same kind-of cohort but perhaps 6years ahead,
wrote his thesis in OverLeaf and did very well in it.

The markup is XArchiV and journal friendly: His chances of getting
through peer review barriers which obsess with form, and not function
(sad) is better.

Sometimes, being the stand-out is not good. I was the only visible
Athiest in school and when I found a copy of the scots prayer book, it
was different page numbers and I couldn't find the hymn before they'd
finished singing it. I guess the example I am giving doesn't help my
own story because I am an essentially HAPPY athiest, but still: you
don't always want to be running against the stream.

If the maths is good, he's born to fly solo, and is heading into place
of excellence, none of this will matter. If he is looking to relate to
his community, it may.

On Fri, Oct 4, 2019 at 2:21 PM Larry McVoy <lm@mcvoy.com> wrote:
>
> So my kid is using LaTex and I'd like to show him what troff can do.
> For the record, back when he was born, 20 years ago, I was program
> chair for Linux Expo (which sounds like a big deal but all it meant
> was I had the job of formatting the proceedings).  LaTex was a big
> deal but I pushed people towards troff and the few people that took
> the push came back and said "holy crap is this easy".
>
> My kid is a math guy, does anyone have some eqn input and output
> that they can share?
>
> Thanks,
>
> --lm

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04  5:12 ` George Michaelson
@ 2019-10-04 13:43   ` Nemo
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Nemo @ 2019-10-04 13:43 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: George Michaelson; +Cc: TUHS main list

On 04/10/2019, George Michaelson <ggm@algebras.org> wrote (in part):
> I'm going to give a contrarian response. You may be wrong, and he
> maybe should do LaTex.
>
> Why?
>
> because it's what his peer group, and professors, and other people
> like markers and tutorial assisters will expect, [...]

Pace Larry but I tend to agree with George here.

N.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04  4:20 [TUHS] eqn Larry McVoy
  2019-10-04  4:35 ` Dave Horsfall
  2019-10-04  5:12 ` George Michaelson
@ 2019-10-04 14:57 ` aksr
  2019-10-04 15:52   ` U'll Be King of the Stars
  2019-10-04 19:25 ` Fabio Scotoni
  3 siblings, 1 reply; 17+ messages in thread
From: aksr @ 2019-10-04 14:57 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

On Thu, Oct 03, 2019 at 09:20:34PM -0700, Larry McVoy wrote:
> My kid is a math guy, does anyone have some eqn input and output 
> that they can share?

Have you tried (heard of) neatroff[1] and neateqn?
Neateqn uses TeX's algorithm for typesetting mathematical formulas.[2]
Here is an example: http://litcave.rudi.ir/neateqndemo.pdf

[1] http://litcave.rudi.ir/neatroff.pdf
[2] http://litcave.rudi.ir/neateqn.pdf

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 14:57 ` aksr
@ 2019-10-04 15:52   ` U'll Be King of the Stars
  2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
                       ` (2 more replies)
  0 siblings, 3 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: U'll Be King of the Stars @ 2019-10-04 15:52 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: aksr, tuhs

On 04/10/2019 15:57, aksr wrote:
> Have you tried (heard of) neatroff[1] and neateqn?
> Neateqn uses TeX's algorithm for typesetting mathematical formulas.[2]
> Here is an example: http://litcave.rudi.ir/neateqndemo.pdf
> 
> [1] http://litcave.rudi.ir/neatroff.pdf
> [2] http://litcave.rudi.ir/neateqn.pdf

I have tried these and I have been in touch with the author.  He was 
very helpful.

One thing that surprised me during our discussions was the revelation 
that Groff is (apparently) optimized for authoring man pages.  I am 
personally interested in *roff as a typesetting system for technical 
documentatio in general.

I do agree with the other folk/s in this thread who have said that 
learning La/TeX is _much_ more advantageous as a _practical_ tool for 
writing maths and CS manuscripts.

I spent about 20 years buried in LaTeX during the academic phase of my 
life.  I don't miss it now but there was no way to collaborate and 
publish using a typesetting setting other than LaTeX because nothing 
else has that kind of commonality.

My field was signal processing, especially as applied to multimedia: 
music and audio specifically.  I would not have been able to write my 
PhD dissertation or write _any_ journal/conference articles without 
knowning LaTeX.

One thing that helped significantly is that I am an Emacs user.  This 
comes with AUCTeX mode, which, when set up properly, makes LaTeX 
tolerable for me.[1]

I now have the freedom to choose *roff for presentational markup for 
personal technical documentation.  I have also joined a project that 
uses DocBook for semantic markup.

But when one needs to collaborate in academia, and if one wants to 
minimize friction when communicating, then LaTeX (or sometimes even MS 
Word) is the standard that one's colleagues in maths, CS, and software 
engineering will use.  Don't be "that person" who causes friction 
unnecessarily; there are plenty more important hills to die on.

One tool I *highly* recommend learning well is Pandoc.  This is 
wonderful for translating between markup formats and even rendering 
output well.

When I would send end-of-week updates to managers, I would often convert 
new documentation that was contained within a restricted repository to 
PDF format and attach that to my email updates as well.

(Just in case there were permissions issues.  For example, corporate 
enterprise firewalls are notoriously difficult to make connections 
through.  They can make the documents even more difficult to access from 
their upstream repositories, and nobody want to be messing around with 
these kinds of permissions issues on a Friday afternoon.)

Andrew

[1] LaTeX is excellent compared to Markdown.  You can build a career on 
top of it but not on top of Markdown.  I don't even consider MD a proper 
markup format, aside from the simplest cases such as writing 
introductory README.md files.  The only thing that La/TeX and MD have in 
common for me is that they are both intolerable without Emacs modes 
(AUCTeX and markdown-down.el).
-- 
OpenPGP key: EB28 0338 28B7 19DA DAB0  B193 D21D 996E 883B E5B9

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 15:52   ` U'll Be King of the Stars
@ 2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
  2019-10-04 17:24       ` Adam Thornton
                         ` (2 more replies)
  2019-10-04 19:02     ` Larry McVoy
  2019-10-07 17:26     ` Seth J. Morabito
  2 siblings, 3 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Jon Forrest @ 2019-10-04 16:12 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs


One slightly OT fact about TeX. On my 16GB, Core i7, SATA SSD
Lenovo T430s laptop running Fedora 30, it takes ~3 seconds to run TeX on
the ~900 page TeXBook. That's pretty fast. TeX contains all kinds of
code to make it fit in the constraints of a 1980s computer. I wonder
whether a redesign for a 2020 computer would be faster or slower.

I suspect, but can't prove, that classic [nt]roff might also
benefit in the same way. groff was written latter, so it might
suffer less.

Jon

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
@ 2019-10-04 17:24       ` Adam Thornton
  2019-10-04 18:55         ` Kurt H Maier
  2019-10-04 17:43       ` Steffen Nurpmeso
  2019-10-06  8:03       ` arnold
  2 siblings, 1 reply; 17+ messages in thread
From: Adam Thornton @ 2019-10-04 17:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

[-- Attachment #1: Type: text/plain, Size: 707 bytes --]

A modern TeX would probably look a lot like SILE:

http://sile-typesetter.org/

Simon's a smart guy.  It's a pretty neat project.

On Fri, Oct 4, 2019 at 9:13 AM Jon Forrest <nobozo@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> One slightly OT fact about TeX. On my 16GB, Core i7, SATA SSD
> Lenovo T430s laptop running Fedora 30, it takes ~3 seconds to run TeX on
> the ~900 page TeXBook. That's pretty fast. TeX contains all kinds of
> code to make it fit in the constraints of a 1980s computer. I wonder
> whether a redesign for a 2020 computer would be faster or slower.
>
> I suspect, but can't prove, that classic [nt]roff might also
> benefit in the same way. groff was written latter, so it might
> suffer less.
>
> Jon
>

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^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
  2019-10-04 17:24       ` Adam Thornton
@ 2019-10-04 17:43       ` Steffen Nurpmeso
  2019-10-06  8:03       ` arnold
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Steffen Nurpmeso @ 2019-10-04 17:43 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jon Forrest; +Cc: tuhs

Jon Forrest wrote in <389f5a69-e103-7ec3-9b95-3e6e294a86e6@gmail.com>:
 |One slightly OT fact about TeX. On my 16GB, Core i7, SATA SSD
 |Lenovo T430s laptop running Fedora 30, it takes ~3 seconds to run TeX on
 |the ~900 page TeXBook. That's pretty fast. TeX contains all kinds of
 |code to make it fit in the constraints of a 1980s computer. I wonder
 |whether a redesign for a 2020 computer would be faster or slower.

It made a really huge difference whether you base upon the plain
TeX macros, maybe with epsf.tex for embedding .eps files, and
colordvi.tex for colors in slides, index and bibliography reviews
etc., or whether you use the huge LaTeX macros.  Also lazy loading
fonts added upon that, i finally added that and it saved a 1-2
second hang upon program startup (plain tex plus ~250kb single
file macro, plus the mentioned included) for each and every letter
that was sent out.

  % 00-05-31: new scheme to avoid waste. now a font is init only if it's used.
  % 2Compare (Cyrix 166+, 49MB, Linux 2.2.13-12, X 3.3.5):
  % | OLD                               | NEW                                   |
  % |-----------------------------------|---------------------------------------|
  % | 1178 strings out of 13013         | 1413 strings out of 13013             |
  % | 13106 string characters of 122154 | 17026 string characters of 122154     |
  % | 35574 words of memory of 263001   | 54220 words of memory of 263001       |
  % | 2086 multiletter of 10000+0       | 2321 multiletter of 10000+0           |
  % | 80647 font info for 276 fonts     | 20674 words of font info for 70 fonts |
  %   (out of 400000 for 1000)

 |I suspect, but can't prove, that classic [nt]roff might also
 |benefit in the same way. groff was written latter, so it might
 |suffer less.
 |
 |Jon
 --End of <389f5a69-e103-7ec3-9b95-3e6e294a86e6@gmail.com>

--steffen
|
|Der Kragenbaer,                The moon bear,
|der holt sich munter           he cheerfully and one by one
|einen nach dem anderen runter  wa.ks himself off
|(By Robert Gernhardt)

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 17:24       ` Adam Thornton
@ 2019-10-04 18:55         ` Kurt H Maier
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Kurt H Maier @ 2019-10-04 18:55 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Adam Thornton; +Cc: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

On Fri, Oct 04, 2019 at 10:24:11AM -0700, Adam Thornton wrote:
> A modern TeX would probably look a lot like SILE:
> 
> http://sile-typesetter.org/
> 
> Simon's a smart guy.  It's a pretty neat project.

I always bristled at SILE being described as a typesetting program.
It's a desktop publishing suite.  The whole advantage of roff and TeX is
that you're freed from micromanaging everything.  SILE takes that base
from TeX, and then puts back in all the knobs that a certain kind of
person likes to fiddle with.  This means if you're collaborating with
any sized group on a document, and you're using SILE, someone will turn
it into a figure-positioning bikeshedding competition. 

khm

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 15:52   ` U'll Be King of the Stars
  2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
@ 2019-10-04 19:02     ` Larry McVoy
  2019-10-07 17:26     ` Seth J. Morabito
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Larry McVoy @ 2019-10-04 19:02 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: U'll Be King of the Stars; +Cc: tuhs

My complaint with LaTex et al is that it is escape based.  Roff wants
stuff to start at the beginning of the line.  Which mean Roff input will
version control *dramatically* better which leads to better collaboration.

My kid already knows Latex, I'd like him to try roff.

On Fri, Oct 04, 2019 at 04:52:29PM +0100, U'll Be King of the Stars wrote:
> On 04/10/2019 15:57, aksr wrote:
> >Have you tried (heard of) neatroff[1] and neateqn?
> >Neateqn uses TeX's algorithm for typesetting mathematical formulas.[2]
> >Here is an example: http://litcave.rudi.ir/neateqndemo.pdf
> >
> >[1] http://litcave.rudi.ir/neatroff.pdf
> >[2] http://litcave.rudi.ir/neateqn.pdf
> 
> I have tried these and I have been in touch with the author.  He was very
> helpful.
> 
> One thing that surprised me during our discussions was the revelation that
> Groff is (apparently) optimized for authoring man pages.  I am personally
> interested in *roff as a typesetting system for technical documentatio in
> general.
> 
> I do agree with the other folk/s in this thread who have said that learning
> La/TeX is _much_ more advantageous as a _practical_ tool for writing maths
> and CS manuscripts.
> 
> I spent about 20 years buried in LaTeX during the academic phase of my life.
> I don't miss it now but there was no way to collaborate and publish using a
> typesetting setting other than LaTeX because nothing else has that kind of
> commonality.
> 
> My field was signal processing, especially as applied to multimedia: music
> and audio specifically.  I would not have been able to write my PhD
> dissertation or write _any_ journal/conference articles without knowning
> LaTeX.
> 
> One thing that helped significantly is that I am an Emacs user.  This comes
> with AUCTeX mode, which, when set up properly, makes LaTeX tolerable for
> me.[1]
> 
> I now have the freedom to choose *roff for presentational markup for
> personal technical documentation.  I have also joined a project that uses
> DocBook for semantic markup.
> 
> But when one needs to collaborate in academia, and if one wants to minimize
> friction when communicating, then LaTeX (or sometimes even MS Word) is the
> standard that one's colleagues in maths, CS, and software engineering will
> use.  Don't be "that person" who causes friction unnecessarily; there are
> plenty more important hills to die on.
> 
> One tool I *highly* recommend learning well is Pandoc.  This is wonderful
> for translating between markup formats and even rendering output well.
> 
> When I would send end-of-week updates to managers, I would often convert new
> documentation that was contained within a restricted repository to PDF
> format and attach that to my email updates as well.
> 
> (Just in case there were permissions issues.  For example, corporate
> enterprise firewalls are notoriously difficult to make connections through.
> They can make the documents even more difficult to access from their
> upstream repositories, and nobody want to be messing around with these kinds
> of permissions issues on a Friday afternoon.)
> 
> Andrew
> 
> [1] LaTeX is excellent compared to Markdown.  You can build a career on top
> of it but not on top of Markdown.  I don't even consider MD a proper markup
> format, aside from the simplest cases such as writing introductory README.md
> files.  The only thing that La/TeX and MD have in common for me is that they
> are both intolerable without Emacs modes (AUCTeX and markdown-down.el).
> -- 
> OpenPGP key: EB28 0338 28B7 19DA DAB0  B193 D21D 996E 883B E5B9

-- 
---
Larry McVoy            	     lm at mcvoy.com             http://www.mcvoy.com/lm 

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04  4:20 [TUHS] eqn Larry McVoy
                   ` (2 preceding siblings ...)
  2019-10-04 14:57 ` aksr
@ 2019-10-04 19:25 ` Fabio Scotoni
  3 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Fabio Scotoni @ 2019-10-04 19:25 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Larry McVoy, TUHS main list

On 10/4/19 6:20 AM, Larry McVoy wrote:
> So my kid is using LaTex and I'd like to show him what troff can do.
> For the record, back when he was born, 20 years ago, I was program
> chair for Linux Expo (which sounds like a big deal but all it meant
> was I had the job of formatting the proceedings).  LaTex was a big
> deal but I pushed people towards troff and the few people that took
> the push came back and said "holy crap is this easy".
> 
> My kid is a math guy, does anyone have some eqn input and output 
> that they can share?

I've got no such thing that I still have available to myself,
but perhaps "A System for Typesetting Mathematics" in the 7th Edition
manual volume 2A would be something of relevance?
It's both an introduction to eqn(1) and shows off what it can do.

https://tex.loria.fr/divers/unix-eqn1.ps.gz

http://www.kohala.com/start/troff/v7man/eqn/eqn2e.ps
^ seemingly updated version, found dvia Schaffter's mom macro documentation

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
@ 2019-10-05  1:59 Doug McIlroy
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Doug McIlroy @ 2019-10-05  1:59 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

> does anyone have some eqn input and output that they can share?

I have a quite elaborate document that uses eqn, pic, and tbl. In
fact one table contains both pic and eqn entries (but not subtables;
Latex beats roff in being recursive). Take a look at
www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~doug/wallpaper.pdf. If you think you'd like
to see the source, just holler.

> he maybe should do Latex

Sadly, math journals often demand Latex, but I've also run into
journals that require Word. I wanted to submit the document above
to a cartography journal until I found out they were in the
Word camp. I was, however, able to convert it to Latex. 

At one point the American Instutute of Physics took only roff
(and retypeset other manuscripts--in roff). I don't know what
their practice is q
now.

> Maybe v0 didn't have any manuals?
> I understand they weren't in roff anyways.

No manuals, true. But if there had been they would have been
in some version of roff, just as all Research Unix manuals were.

Doug

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
  2019-10-04 17:24       ` Adam Thornton
  2019-10-04 17:43       ` Steffen Nurpmeso
@ 2019-10-06  8:03       ` arnold
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: arnold @ 2019-10-06  8:03 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs, nobozo

Jon Forrest <nobozo@gmail.com> wrote:

> One slightly OT fact about TeX. On my 16GB, Core i7, SATA SSD
> Lenovo T430s laptop running Fedora 30, it takes ~3 seconds to run TeX on
> the ~900 page TeXBook. That's pretty fast.

You can thank Moore's Law for this. I remember trying to run TeX on
BSD 4.[12] vax with 4 Meg of memory and it taking many minutes to format
a single page.

The first time it became easy to run TeX, for me, was on sparcstation
class systems in the early 1990s.

> TeX contains all kinds of
> code to make it fit in the constraints of a 1980s computer. I wonder
> whether a redesign for a 2020 computer would be faster or slower.

I think it's just compute-intensive code. Moern versions of TeX use
WebToC to translate Knuth's web/pascal code to C, and that has been
the case for a long time.

(As an aside, everyone here who's read "TeX: The Program", raise
you hand.  [I have, but only once.])

> I suspect, but can't prove, that classic [nt]roff might also
> benefit in the same way. groff was written latter, so it might
> suffer less.

I don't think classic [nt]roff suffers at all. I remember (boy do I sound
like an old f*art) circa 1991, having both nroff and groff on a '486 class
system.  nroff was noticeably faster at formatting man pages than
groff was.  (Groff, of course, was ditroff and gave me PostScript output,
but comparing the two versions of nroff for text output, there
was a noticeable difference.)

Again, today, it doesn't really matter.

Arnold

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-04 15:52   ` U'll Be King of the Stars
  2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
  2019-10-04 19:02     ` Larry McVoy
@ 2019-10-07 17:26     ` Seth J. Morabito
  2019-10-07 19:14       ` Adam Thornton
  2 siblings, 1 reply; 17+ messages in thread
From: Seth J. Morabito @ 2019-10-07 17:26 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs


U'll Be King of the Stars writes:

> On 04/10/2019 15:57, aksr wrote:
>
> [1] LaTeX is excellent compared to Markdown.  You can build a career
> on top of it but not on top of Markdown.  I don't even consider MD a
> proper markup format, aside from the simplest cases such as writing
> introductory README.md files.  The only thing that La/TeX and MD have
> in common for me is that they are both intolerable without Emacs modes
> (AUCTeX and markdown-down.el).

[With sincere apologies for taking this slightly more off-topic, but
still within the realm of the vaguely UNIX-y...]

This is one of the reasons I live in Emacs, too. I make extensive use of
org-mode, not only for organizing my life, but also for generating
documentation. Org-mode has extensive native support for LaTeX markup,
and exporting marked-up documents to PDF via LaTeX. Additionally, of
course, it can export to HTML and even Markdown if you like. But the
LaTeX support makes it killer.

In fact, veering back on-topic, there is even a mode to export Org-mode
files to Groff Memorandum Macros documents[1]! It's a pretty powerful
system.

-Seth


[1] https://orgmode.org/worg/exporters/ox-groff.html
--
Seth Morabito
Poulsbo, WA, USA
web@loomcom.com

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-07 17:26     ` Seth J. Morabito
@ 2019-10-07 19:14       ` Adam Thornton
  2019-10-08 21:11         ` Seth Morabito
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 17+ messages in thread
From: Adam Thornton @ 2019-10-07 19:14 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Seth J. Morabito, The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

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And just in case you didn't know about it....

https://github.com/yjwen/org-reveal

This converts org-mode docs to reveal.js presentations.

https://athornton.github.io/Jupyter-PCW-2019/ is an example

On Mon, Oct 7, 2019 at 10:36 AM Seth J. Morabito <web@loomcom.com> wrote:

>
> U'll Be King of the Stars writes:
>
> > On 04/10/2019 15:57, aksr wrote:
> >
> > [1] LaTeX is excellent compared to Markdown.  You can build a career
> > on top of it but not on top of Markdown.  I don't even consider MD a
> > proper markup format, aside from the simplest cases such as writing
> > introductory README.md files.  The only thing that La/TeX and MD have
> > in common for me is that they are both intolerable without Emacs modes
> > (AUCTeX and markdown-down.el).
>
> [With sincere apologies for taking this slightly more off-topic, but
> still within the realm of the vaguely UNIX-y...]
>
> This is one of the reasons I live in Emacs, too. I make extensive use of
> org-mode, not only for organizing my life, but also for generating
> documentation. Org-mode has extensive native support for LaTeX markup,
> and exporting marked-up documents to PDF via LaTeX. Additionally, of
> course, it can export to HTML and even Markdown if you like. But the
> LaTeX support makes it killer.
>
> In fact, veering back on-topic, there is even a mode to export Org-mode
> files to Groff Memorandum Macros documents[1]! It's a pretty powerful
> system.
>
> -Seth
>
>
> [1] https://orgmode.org/worg/exporters/ox-groff.html
> --
> Seth Morabito
> Poulsbo, WA, USA
> web@loomcom.com
>

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^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] eqn
  2019-10-07 19:14       ` Adam Thornton
@ 2019-10-08 21:11         ` Seth Morabito
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 17+ messages in thread
From: Seth Morabito @ 2019-10-08 21:11 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Adam Thornton, The Eunuchs Hysterical Society



On Mon, Oct 7, 2019, at 12:14 PM, Adam Thornton wrote:
> And just in case you didn't know about it....
> 
> https://github.com/yjwen/org-reveal
> 
> This converts org-mode docs to reveal.js presentations.
> 
> https://athornton.github.io/Jupyter-PCW-2019/ is an example

I was not familiar with this, thanks for pointing it out!

In the past, for presentations I have used org-beamer to produce LaTeX Beamer presentations, which works very well, but of course there are no fancy transitions or anything. I'll definitely check out reveal.js, I didn't know that was a thing.

-Seth
--
 Seth Morabito
 Poulsbo, WA
 web@loomcom.com


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 17+ messages in thread

end of thread, back to index

Thread overview: 17+ messages (download: mbox.gz / follow: Atom feed)
-- links below jump to the message on this page --
2019-10-04  4:20 [TUHS] eqn Larry McVoy
2019-10-04  4:35 ` Dave Horsfall
2019-10-04  5:12 ` George Michaelson
2019-10-04 13:43   ` Nemo
2019-10-04 14:57 ` aksr
2019-10-04 15:52   ` U'll Be King of the Stars
2019-10-04 16:12     ` Jon Forrest
2019-10-04 17:24       ` Adam Thornton
2019-10-04 18:55         ` Kurt H Maier
2019-10-04 17:43       ` Steffen Nurpmeso
2019-10-06  8:03       ` arnold
2019-10-04 19:02     ` Larry McVoy
2019-10-07 17:26     ` Seth J. Morabito
2019-10-07 19:14       ` Adam Thornton
2019-10-08 21:11         ` Seth Morabito
2019-10-04 19:25 ` Fabio Scotoni
2019-10-05  1:59 Doug McIlroy

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