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* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
@ 2021-02-13  9:00 Brian Walden
  2021-02-13 15:20 ` Will Senn
  2021-02-13 17:13 ` Mary Ann Horton
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Brian Walden @ 2021-02-13  9:00 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

Thank you for banner! I used the data, abliet modified, 40 years ago
in 1981, for a banner program as well, on an IBM 1130 (manufactured 1972)
so it could print on an 1132 line printer. The floor would vibrate
when it printed those banners. I used "X" as the printed char as the
1132 did not have the # char. But those banners looked great!
I wrote it in FORTRAN IV. On punched cards. I did this because
from 1980-1982 I only had access to UNIX on Monday evenings from
7PM-9PM, using a DEC LA120 terminal, it was slow and never had
enough ink on the ribbon.

I had only 8K of core memory with only EBCIDIC uppercase so there
were lots of compromises and cleverness needed -
- read in a 16-bit integer as a packed two 8-bit numbers
- limit the banner output to only A-Za-z0-9 !?#@'*+,-.=
- unpack the char data into buffer and then process it.
- fix the "U" charater data
- find the run-lenght ecnodings that could be consoldated to save space
  (seeing those made me think it had to have been generated data)

The program still survives here - http://ibm1130.cuzuco.com/
(with sample output runs)

Also since I had to type all those numbers onto punch cards
with a 029 keypunch, to speed things up I coded my own free-form
atoi() equivalent in FORTRAN, reading cards, then packed two numbers into
a integer, then punch out those numbers along with card ID numbers in columns
73-80 on the 1442.  This was many weeks of keypunching, checking,
fixing and re-keypunching.
That code is here http://ibm1130.cuzuco.com/ipack.html

When done the deck was around 8" or so. It took well over a
minute to read in the data cards, after complition.

Again thanks! Many hundreds of banners for many people were printed
by this, around 2 to 3 a week, until July 1982, when that IBM
was replaced by a Prime system. I still have many found memeories of
that 1130.

-Brian

Mary Ann Horton (mah at mhorton.net) wrote:
> We had vtroff at Berkeley around 1980, on the big Versatec wet plotter,
> 4 pages wide. We got really good at cutting up the pages on the output.
>
> It used the Hershey font. It was horrible. Mangled somehow, lots of
> parts of glyphs missing. I called it the "Horse Shit" font.
>
> I took it as my mission to clean it up. I wrote "fed" to edit it, dot by
> dot, on the graphical HP 2648 terminal at Berkeley. I got all the fonts
> reasonably cleaned up, but it was laborious.
>
> I still hated Hershey. It was my dream to get real C/A/T output at the
> largest 36 point size, and scan it in to create a decent set of Times
> fonts. I finally got the C/A/T output years later at Bell Labs, but
> there were no scanners available to me at the time. Then True Type came
> along and it was moot.
>
> I did stumble onto one nice rendition of Times Roman in one point size,
> from Stanford, I think. I used it to write banner(6).


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-13  9:00 [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Brian Walden
@ 2021-02-13 15:20 ` Will Senn
  2021-02-13 16:57   ` Warner Losh
  2021-02-13 17:13 ` Mary Ann Horton
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Will Senn @ 2021-02-13 15:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

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On 2/13/21 3:00 AM, Brian Walden wrote:
> Thank you for banner! I used the data, abliet modified, 40 years ago
> in 1981, for a banner program as well, on an IBM 1130 (manufactured 1972)
> so it could print on an 1132 line printer. The floor would vibrate
> when it printed those banners. I used "X" as the printed char as the
> 1132 did not have the # char. But those banners looked great!
> I wrote it in FORTRAN IV. On punched cards. I did this because
> from 1980-1982 I only had access to UNIX on Monday evenings from
> 7PM-9PM, using a DEC LA120 terminal, it was slow and never had
> enough ink on the ribbon.
>
> I had only 8K of core memory with only EBCIDIC uppercase so there
> were lots of compromises and cleverness needed -
> - read in a 16-bit integer as a packed two 8-bit numbers
> - limit the banner output to only A-Za-z0-9 !?#@'*+,-.=
> - unpack the char data into buffer and then process it.
> - fix the "U" charater data
> - find the run-lenght ecnodings that could be consoldated to save space
>    (seeing those made me think it had to have been generated data)
>
> The program still survives here - http://ibm1130.cuzuco.com/
> (with sample output runs)
>
> Also since I had to type all those numbers onto punch cards
> with a 029 keypunch, to speed things up I coded my own free-form
> atoi() equivalent in FORTRAN, reading cards, then packed two numbers into
> a integer, then punch out those numbers along with card ID numbers in columns
> 73-80 on the 1442.  This was many weeks of keypunching, checking,
> fixing and re-keypunching.
> That code is here http://ibm1130.cuzuco.com/ipack.html
>
> When done the deck was around 8" or so. It took well over a
> minute to read in the data cards, after complition.
>
> Again thanks! Many hundreds of banners for many people were printed
> by this, around 2 to 3 a week, until July 1982, when that IBM
> was replaced by a Prime system. I still have many found memeories of
> that 1130.
>
> -Brian
>
> Mary Ann Horton (mah at mhorton.net) wrote:
>> We had vtroff at Berkeley around 1980, on the big Versatec wet plotter,
>> 4 pages wide. We got really good at cutting up the pages on the output.
>>
>> It used the Hershey font. It was horrible. Mangled somehow, lots of
>> parts of glyphs missing. I called it the "Horse Shit" font.
>>
>> I took it as my mission to clean it up. I wrote "fed" to edit it, dot by
>> dot, on the graphical HP 2648 terminal at Berkeley. I got all the fonts
>> reasonably cleaned up, but it was laborious.
>>
>> I still hated Hershey. It was my dream to get real C/A/T output at the
>> largest 36 point size, and scan it in to create a decent set of Times
>> fonts. I finally got the C/A/T output years later at Bell Labs, but
>> there were no scanners available to me at the time. Then True Type came
>> along and it was moot.
>>
>> I did stumble onto one nice rendition of Times Roman in one point size,
>> from Stanford, I think. I used it to write banner(6).
Nice. I wrote a banner program in 1984, as a freshman in college for the 
TRS-80 Model 100 laptop (with an 8x40 LCD), in BASIC, which if I recall 
was the OS of the thing? It would peek the character ROM and use the 
encodings (characters were stored in ROM as a 2d binary array bitmap) to 
determine what to print to the printer and did some form of vertical and 
horizontal expansion to reasonably fill up the sheets. I don't remember 
if I took the horizontal and vertical expansion as input from the user 
or what (it's been a while, and the code is long gone), or if I just 
figured out what looked good on the ol' dot matrix we had access to and 
set them... but it was, at the time, my crowning achievement in 
programming. Everyone else in the class took pages and pages of code to 
print their banners without reference to the character ROM, whereas mine 
did it in very few lines of easy to understand, if somewhat complex (not 
complicated, mind you), code (the story of my much later career).

Wow, that brings back memories :).. snip! after writing what turned into 
my life story, I decided to spare y'all. Suffice it to say my early 
experiences with computation (Commodore PET, TRS-80 Model 100, DEC 
Rainbow 100) and later more formal educational experiences (my first 
real maths and upper division cs professors) changed my life's 
trajectory and gave me the tools to help me rise out of decades of 
extremely harsh circumstances. Thank you Dennis, especially for C. I 
wish I could have known you and thanked you personally. C was my vehicle 
out of the depths of poverty and hardship. Sigh, sniff, and smile. Now, 
I explore Unix, both historic and modern for fun, pester y'all with 
questions, opinions, and sundry, teach CS and IS for fun and pay, and 
hope that I can share 1/10th of the joy I experience every day with my 
students and inspire them to pursue careers in the field.

Banner on!

Will

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* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-13 15:20 ` Will Senn
@ 2021-02-13 16:57   ` Warner Losh
  2021-02-13 20:09     ` Dave Horsfall
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Warner Losh @ 2021-02-13 16:57 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Will Senn; +Cc: TUHS main list

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On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 8:21 AM Will Senn <will.senn@gmail.com> wrote:

> Nice. I wrote a banner program in 1984
>

I wrote one in 83. And several of my fellow students at college did this as
well. It seemed to be a common thing back in the day.

Warner

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* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-13  9:00 [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Brian Walden
  2021-02-13 15:20 ` Will Senn
@ 2021-02-13 17:13 ` Mary Ann Horton
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Mary Ann Horton @ 2021-02-13 17:13 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Brian Walden, tuhs

Thank you for the kind words, and the inspiring story of your port to 
FORTRAN! I was surprised to find there is a Wikipedia page for the 
banner program.

This brings back earlier memories for me. In High School in 1972, our 
school had an ASR33 and dial-up access to an HP BASIC system. We were 
also lucky enough to be part of a scouting program that gave us access 
to a UNIVAC 1108 mainframe at nearby Gulf General Atomic, where we could 
keypunch and run FORTRAN programs and print onto a fast line printer.

One of my programs was a simpler banner program, printing large sideways 
banners with the 5x7 dot matrix I'd seen on Decwriters and CRT 
terminals. I drew and typed in the data by hand, a far simpler job since 
it was only 5x7, and the output was blocky.

I supported upper and lower case, but like the terminals, there was no 
room below the baseline for descenders, and characters like "g" wound up 
elevated. I printed our high school catch phrase, "Debug Off Line!", and 
posted above the ASR33 at school. I got lots of crap about how the g 
looked like a 9.

One friend signed my senior high school yearbook with the tag line 
"Debu9 Off Line!"

On 2/13/21 1:00 AM, Brian Walden wrote:
> Thank you for banner! I used the data, abliet modified, 40 years ago
> in 1981, for a banner program as well, on an IBM 1130 (manufactured 1972)
> so it could print on an 1132 line printer. The floor would vibrate
> when it printed those banners. I used "X" as the printed char as the
> 1132 did not have the # char. But those banners looked great!
> I wrote it in FORTRAN IV. On punched cards. I did this because
> from 1980-1982 I only had access to UNIX on Monday evenings from
> 7PM-9PM, using a DEC LA120 terminal, it was slow and never had
> enough ink on the ribbon.
>

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-13 16:57   ` Warner Losh
@ 2021-02-13 20:09     ` Dave Horsfall
  2021-02-13 20:28       ` [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4 Jim Capp
  2021-02-13 22:21       ` [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Mike Markowski
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Dave Horsfall @ 2021-02-13 20:09 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

On Sat, 13 Feb 2021, Warner Losh wrote:

> I wrote one in 83. And several of my fellow students at college did this 
> as well. It seemed to be a common thing back in the day.

I've used lots of different banner programs on various systems; I think 
even OS/360 had one (well, ours did anyway).

-- Dave

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4
  2021-02-13 20:09     ` Dave Horsfall
@ 2021-02-13 20:28       ` Jim Capp
  2021-02-13 20:36         ` Earl Baugh
  2021-02-13 22:13         ` Grant Taylor via TUHS
  2021-02-13 22:21       ` [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Mike Markowski
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Jim Capp @ 2021-02-13 20:28 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

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Hey folks, 


Is anyone interested in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4? I haven't touched these devices in 10+ years, and they were working before they were put on the shelf. I'd like to send them to a good home, rather than the local recycling center. 


Cheers, 


Jim 

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* Re: [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4
  2021-02-13 20:28       ` [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4 Jim Capp
@ 2021-02-13 20:36         ` Earl Baugh
  2021-02-13 20:45           ` Jim Capp
  2021-02-13 22:13         ` Grant Taylor via TUHS
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Earl Baugh @ 2021-02-13 20:36 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jim Capp; +Cc: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

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What size? I’d be interested in both, depending on models. 

Earl 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 13, 2021, at 3:29 PM, Jim Capp <jcapp@anteil.com> wrote:
> 
> 
> Hey folks,
> 
> Is anyone interested in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4?  I haven't touched these devices in 10+ years, and they were working before they were put on the shelf.  I'd like to send them to a good home, rather than the local recycling center.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Jim
> 

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^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4
  2021-02-13 20:36         ` Earl Baugh
@ 2021-02-13 20:45           ` Jim Capp
  2021-02-13 21:24             ` Earl Baugh
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Jim Capp @ 2021-02-13 20:45 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Earl Baugh; +Cc: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

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The DEC Alpha is about the size of a typical PC. I take some pictures tomorrow and send them to you. 


From: "Earl Baugh" <earl.baugh@gmail.com> 
To: "Jim Capp" <jcapp@anteil.com> 
Cc: "The Eunuchs Hysterical Society" <tuhs@tuhs.org> 
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 3:36:39 PM 
Subject: Re: [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4 

What size? I’d be interested in both, depending on models. 


Earl 


Sent from my iPhone 



On Feb 13, 2021, at 3:29 PM, Jim Capp <jcapp@anteil.com> wrote: 






Hey folks, 


Is anyone interested in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4? I haven't touched these devices in 10+ years, and they were working before they were put on the shelf. I'd like to send them to a good home, rather than the local recycling center. 


Cheers, 


Jim 

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* Re: [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4
  2021-02-13 20:45           ` Jim Capp
@ 2021-02-13 21:24             ` Earl Baugh
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Earl Baugh @ 2021-02-13 21:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jim Capp; +Cc: The Eunuchs Hysterical Society

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That would be great, thanks!
You can reply directly to me at earl@baugh.org

Earl

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 3:45 PM Jim Capp <jcapp@anteil.com> wrote:

> The DEC Alpha is about the size of a typical PC.  I take some pictures
> tomorrow and send them to you.
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Earl Baugh" <earl.baugh@gmail.com>
> *To: *"Jim Capp" <jcapp@anteil.com>
> *Cc: *"The Eunuchs Hysterical Society" <tuhs@tuhs.org>
> *Sent: *Saturday, February 13, 2021 3:36:39 PM
> *Subject: *Re: [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4
>
> What size? I’d be interested in both, depending on models.
>
> Earl
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 13, 2021, at 3:29 PM, Jim Capp <jcapp@anteil.com> wrote:
>
> 
> Hey folks,
>
> Is anyone interested in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4?  I haven't touched
> these devices in 10+ years, and they were working before they were put on
> the shelf.  I'd like to send them to a good home, rather than the local
> recycling center.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Jim
>
>

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^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4
  2021-02-13 20:28       ` [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4 Jim Capp
  2021-02-13 20:36         ` Earl Baugh
@ 2021-02-13 22:13         ` Grant Taylor via TUHS
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Grant Taylor via TUHS @ 2021-02-13 22:13 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

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On 2/13/21 1:28 PM, Jim Capp wrote:
> Hey folks,

Hi,

> Is anyone interested in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4?  I haven't touched 
> these devices in 10+ years, and they were working before they were put 
> on the shelf.  I'd like to send them to a good home, rather than the 
> local recycling center.

Where are they located?



-- 
Grant. . . .
unix || die


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* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-13 20:09     ` Dave Horsfall
  2021-02-13 20:28       ` [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4 Jim Capp
@ 2021-02-13 22:21       ` Mike Markowski
  2021-02-14  0:27         ` Mary Ann Horton
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Mike Markowski @ 2021-02-13 22:21 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

On 2/13/21 3:09 PM, Dave Horsfall wrote:
> On Sat, 13 Feb 2021, Warner Losh wrote:
> 
>> I wrote one in 83. And several of my fellow students at college did 
>> this as well. It seemed to be a common thing back in the day.
> 
> I've used lots of different banner programs on various systems; I think 
> even OS/360 had one (well, ours did anyway).
> 
> -- Dave

As an undergrad in the early 1980s, posters made from line printer 
strips were popular.  Character overstrikes were used as pixels and 
could be discerned as photos from a few feet away.  These filled a wall 
in our student office / study area.  Given the times & 100% male 
occupancy, let's just say the posters wouldn't fly today...  Each poster 
was multiple strips wide.  Does such a program ring a bell?  Ascii art 
was popular, but I don't recall details on making them.

Mike Markowski


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-13 22:21       ` [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Mike Markowski
@ 2021-02-14  0:27         ` Mary Ann Horton
  2021-02-14  3:33           ` Will Senn
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Mary Ann Horton @ 2021-02-14  0:27 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

Picture tapes. I had a collection of 20 or so. A few of them were girly 
pictures, but there were several excellent ones. Nemoy as Spock holding 
a model of the Enterprise. Neil Armstrong on the moon. My favorite was 
the PSA grinning bird over the San Francisco Bay - it was 8 strips wide. 
FORTRAN carriage control to cause overstriking. I recently got my 
collection read off the magtape.

My understanding was the a photo was scanned at 256 grayscale levels, 
and the program let you tune the contrast with 16 gray levels of 
different overstrikes, ranging from 4 blanks to M, W, X, @ overstruck.

There's a tool called asa2pdf that can turn the carriage control files 
into PDF, but printing on a laser printer leads to a chore with an 
office paper cutter and lots of staples and scotch tape. I put one 
together of SAN FRAN as a parting gift to a coworker at my retirement 
luncheon.

     Mary Ann

On 2/13/21 2:21 PM, Mike Markowski wrote:
> On 2/13/21 3:09 PM, Dave Horsfall wrote:
>> On Sat, 13 Feb 2021, Warner Losh wrote:
>>
>>> I wrote one in 83. And several of my fellow students at college did 
>>> this as well. It seemed to be a common thing back in the day.
>>
>> I've used lots of different banner programs on various systems; I 
>> think even OS/360 had one (well, ours did anyway).
>>
>> -- Dave
>
> As an undergrad in the early 1980s, posters made from line printer 
> strips were popular.  Character overstrikes were used as pixels and 
> could be discerned as photos from a few feet away.  These filled a 
> wall in our student office / study area.  Given the times & 100% male 
> occupancy, let's just say the posters wouldn't fly today...  Each 
> poster was multiple strips wide.  Does such a program ring a bell?  
> Ascii art was popular, but I don't recall details on making them.
>
> Mike Markowski
>

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-14  0:27         ` Mary Ann Horton
@ 2021-02-14  3:33           ` Will Senn
  2021-02-15 17:32             ` Tom Lyon
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 15+ messages in thread
From: Will Senn @ 2021-02-14  3:33 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Mary Ann Horton, tuhs

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On 2/13/21 6:27 PM, Mary Ann Horton wrote:
> Picture tapes. I had a collection of 20 or so. A few of them were 
> girly pictures, but there were several excellent ones. Nemoy as Spock 
> holding a model of the Enterprise.

I remember this one from back in the day:

https://www.atariarchives.org/bcc1/showpage.php?page=cover1

Detail from image (small enough to include here):



Will

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* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
  2021-02-14  3:33           ` Will Senn
@ 2021-02-15 17:32             ` Tom Lyon
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Tom Lyon @ 2021-02-15 17:32 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Will Senn; +Cc: tuhs


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I believe many of these images, especially Spock, came from Sam Harbison
(RIP) at Princeton.
They were EBCDIC art, not ASCII!  Made on the IBM/360 with the 1403 printer.
See http://q7.neurotica.com/Oldtech/ASCII/

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 7:34 PM Will Senn <will.senn@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 2/13/21 6:27 PM, Mary Ann Horton wrote:
>
> Picture tapes. I had a collection of 20 or so. A few of them were girly
> pictures, but there were several excellent ones. Nemoy as Spock holding a
> model of the Enterprise.
>
>
> I remember this one from back in the day:
>
> https://www.atariarchives.org/bcc1/showpage.php?page=cover1
>
> Detail from image (small enough to include here):
>
>
>
> Will
>


-- 
- Tom

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* Re: [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable)
@ 2021-02-16 19:29 Brian Walden
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 15+ messages in thread
From: Brian Walden @ 2021-02-16 19:29 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: tuhs

BTW that is the same Sam Harbison that co-authored "C: A Reference Manual" -
https://www.amazon.com/Reference-Manual-Samuel-P-Harbison/dp/013089592X

His memorial page is here -
https://paw.princeton.edu/memorial/samuel-p-harbison-74

Those in the Pittsburgh area will recognize that family name.

His father (also Samuel P. Harbison) obituary is here -
https://www.nytimes.com/1976/07/20/archives/samuel-harbison-dies-in-pittsburgh.html

Some information on his grandfather (and yes, also Samuel P. Harbison) is here -
https://sites.google.com/site/1009davisavenue/history
who ran this - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harbison-Walker_Refractories_Company

Tom Lyon <pugs at ieee.org>) wrote:
> I believe many of these images, especially Spock, came from Sam Harbison
> (RIP) at Princeton.
> They were EBCDIC art, not ASCII!  Made on the IBM/360 with the 1403 printer.
> See http://q7.neurotica.com/Oldtech/ASCII/

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 15+ messages in thread

end of thread, other threads:[~2021-02-16 19:31 UTC | newest]

Thread overview: 15+ messages (download: mbox.gz / follow: Atom feed)
-- links below jump to the message on this page --
2021-02-13  9:00 [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Brian Walden
2021-02-13 15:20 ` Will Senn
2021-02-13 16:57   ` Warner Losh
2021-02-13 20:09     ` Dave Horsfall
2021-02-13 20:28       ` [TUHS] Any interest in a Dec Alpha or a Sun Sparc 4 Jim Capp
2021-02-13 20:36         ` Earl Baugh
2021-02-13 20:45           ` Jim Capp
2021-02-13 21:24             ` Earl Baugh
2021-02-13 22:13         ` Grant Taylor via TUHS
2021-02-13 22:21       ` [TUHS] banner (was troff was not so widely usable) Mike Markowski
2021-02-14  0:27         ` Mary Ann Horton
2021-02-14  3:33           ` Will Senn
2021-02-15 17:32             ` Tom Lyon
2021-02-13 17:13 ` Mary Ann Horton
2021-02-16 19:29 Brian Walden

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